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April 5, 2012
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No, this is not a late April Fools' joke. It's real. Some may recognize this as the feathered tyrannosauroid figured back in 2010 in a paper on the ontogeny of Similicaudipteryx. It was described as being "large", and it is. How big was Yutyrannus? About the same size as freaking Gigantoraptor. Or, for even better perspective, the size of Albertosaurus and Gorgosaurus, dwarfing any other known theropod from its environment!

There we go. A large theropod, and a possible tyrannosauroid to boot. Confirmed to have had feathers. More than worth the wait. And remember this? B-) (Probably not; I only had a handful of watchers back then.)

I post most dinosaur news here after the end of each month, but, you see, while the Microraptor feather colors study almost made me do this, this discovery actually made me do it. Several times.
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:iconspongebobfossilpants:
From the linked article:

"It weighed in at 1,400 kilograms (3,100 pounds), and was at least 7 or 8 metres in length. That’s 40 times bigger than Beipiaosaurus, the previous record-holder for largest feathered dinosaur (and another Xu discovery)."

Wasn't Sinocalliopteryx the previous record holder?
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner Aug 19, 2012
Sinocalliopteryx was long, but Beipiaosaurus was heavier.
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:iconspongebobfossilpants:
Did a writeup for this on Tv Tropes: [link]

(I really need to find time to do writeups for Xiaotingia & Samrukia.)
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner Apr 15, 2012
Nice.
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:iconspongebobfossilpants:
That I did a writeup, or that I need to do more?
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner Apr 17, 2012
That you did the writeup.
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:iconspongebobfossilpants:
And now for your Paul-esque suggestion of the week: any chance this thing's an adult Dilong?
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner Apr 15, 2012
Highly unlikely; the holotype of Dilong wasn't fully grown, but it was already pretty close.
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:iconspongebobfossilpants:
Isn't that what they said about Raptorex?
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner Apr 17, 2012
Unlike with Raptorex though no one has questioned the ontogeny of Dilong yet, so it appears to be less ambiguous.
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:iconspongebobfossilpants:
Cool, you started italicizing Raptorex again.
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:iconspongebobfossilpants:
SpongeBobFossilPants Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2012
Place your bets... Will Yuryrannus appear in a documentary within the next five years?
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2012
Not unlikely.
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:iconoaglor:
Oaglor Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
Screw giant cold-blooded, low intelligence lizards, we have to run away from the giant warm-blooded, feathered bird-beasts with teeth!
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:iconcommander-salamander:
commander-salamander Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Perhaps some dinosaur linages are an exception to the "has feathers" rule...
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2012
Sauropods appear to be scaly so far, and probably ceratosaurs and hadrosaurs as well. It remains to be seen whether feathers really are the rule. (They could well be, but still hard to say.) The apparent lack of feathers in those clades could also be a preservation thing though.

For now, I'm just glad we have confirmation large, basal coelurosaurs could (and in this case, did) indeed have had feathers.
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:iconcommander-salamander:
commander-salamander Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Shivers yes.
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:iconbluefluffydinosaur:
BlueFluffyDinosaur Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2012
My dream come true!
I'm sooo excited!
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2012
That makes two of us (and likely more).
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:iconbluefluffydinosaur:
BlueFluffyDinosaur Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2012
Indeed
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:iconchocolatestarfire:
ChocolateStarfire Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
:D This is one of my favorite news items. And Twilight Sparkle is best pony. :)
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2012
It's probably everyone's favorite at this point. XD And yes, yes she is.
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:iconcrash-the-megaraptor:
Crash-the-Megaraptor Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Hmm....but you know, the concept of a feathered Tyrannosaurus battling against a Triceratops covered in quills is.....actually quite bad-ass. XD
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2012
Right you are.
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:iconikechi1:
Ikechi1 Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
up top
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:iconjd-man:
JD-man Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2012
"I post most dinosaur news here after the end of each month, but, you see, while the Microraptor feather colors study almost made me do this, this discovery actually made me do it. Several times."

Why almost (as opposed to actually)?
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2012
Mostly because I was in a public area when I read about the Microraptor feather colors, actually. But just as well, because if anything I'm even more excited about Yutyrannus, if only because I already knew it was coming and because I called it.
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:iconjulio-lacerda:
Julio-Lacerda Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
I've read it was big, but without comparative measurements I have trouble imagining, say, how big "9m" is. So you say it was basically the size of Albertosaurus and Gorgosaurus, huh? I suddenly am much more confident about that fluffly Gorgosaurus pair of mine (regardless if it was a tyrannosaur or not).
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:iconspongebobfossilpants:
SpongeBobFossilPants Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2012
If not a tyrannosauroid, what is it?
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:icontomozaurus:
Tomozaurus Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2012  Student General Artist
My vote currently goes for Megaraptoran - with these as coelurosaurs like found by Mickey Mortimer.
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2012
Darren Naish has suggested that it may be a carcharodontosaur. It may also be something else entirely (see the first comment on that post).
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:iconspongebobfossilpants:
SpongeBobFossilPants Featured By Owner Jul 1, 2012
Any idea what "something else entirely" is?
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner Jul 1, 2012
No, we don't know what that's referring to. Hasn't stopped anyone from guessing though.
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:iconspongebobfossilpants:
My wild mass guess: it's a metriacanthosaurid, sister to Siamotyrannus. What say you?
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner Aug 18, 2012
Some are wild mass guessing that it's actually a megaraptoran but that megaraptorans will turn out to be coelurosaurs.
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:iconspongebobfossilpants:
If that's the case, where do Neovenator & Chilantaisaurus go?
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner Aug 19, 2012
No idea; that's just a broad guess, so hard to say where specific taxa will fall out.
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:iconspongebobfossilpants:
SpongeBobFossilPants Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2012
Paul would pounce on this!*

*Paul has used Guanlong & Neovenator to support a close relationship between carnosaurs & tyrannosauroids.
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2012
Hahaha. XD
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:iconthearchosaurqueen:
TheArchosaurQueen Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
This is my comment “I really do think that many (if not all) dinosaurs had feathers, no matter how much they were covered, their size or their taxonomic proximity to avian dinosaurs. Because once you think about it, nearly all mammals have hair (even aquatic ones and humans), so why would dinosaurs be any different?” to this upload [link] .
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2012
Part of the reason is that we can't be certain where feathers evolved at the moment, so some dinosaurs might have branched off before feathers evolved. And even if that weren't so there do appear to be some dinosaurs that at least appear to have had only scales and not feathers (such as Carnotaurus and titanosaurs). So while I'm plenty open to an early origin of feathers, I don't think it's safe to conclude all dinosaurs had them just yet, though clearly feathered groups such as coelurosaurs probably were universally or almost universally feathered as you suggest.
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:iconthearchosaurqueen:
TheArchosaurQueen Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I do see your point and I maybe jumping the gun, but I feel its possible that my ideas are (in part) supported by a study done on Juravenator’s primitive plumage and scale dispersal [link] . I’m also open to the idea, as I said, that “many (if not all) dinosaurs had feathers”, leaving more then enough room for dinosaurs as featherless as whales are hairless.
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2012
Juravenator shows that feathers were probably less extensive earlier in their evolution, but beyond that I wouldn't infer anything more.
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:iconthearchosaurqueen:
TheArchosaurQueen Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
The point I’m trying to make (without sounding like I believe Sauropods can fly) is how Juravenator appears to had been neither fully feathered nor fully scaled. And that I have an idea, that we may find it a trend in other dinosaurs as well. Patches of “fuzz” alongside scales, osteoderms, quills etc.

Not trying to sound like a know it all by the way, just putting my ideas out their based on tidbits of information I can remember.
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2012
Yes, and I also suspect that was the case for many dinosaurs as well.
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:iconthearchosaurqueen:
TheArchosaurQueen Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Well, I’d say we can see eye to eye now :).

On another note, I’d like an opinion on this please [link] . I’m aware I likely exaggerated and speculated way to much, but I thought it turned out alright for being based on relatives to the House Sparrow and Nile Crocodile.
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