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A new Jehol find? Nope! It's Ornithomimus itself! Two new specimens (an adult and a juvenile) have been found with feather traces, and a long-known adult specimen has been discovered to have what may be attachment points for large feathers on the arms. This means that pennibrachiae go down to the base of maniraptoriforms! The juvenile, however, doesn't preserve pennibrachiae, so it might mean that in these basal maniraptoriforms only the adults had pennibrachiae, and that pennibrachiae originally evolved for display. In addition, this also opens up the possibility of finding feathered dinosaur specimens in coarser-grained sediment than usually expected, as long as fossil hunters keep a sharp eye out for those delicate feather traces.
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:iconfrapt:
frapt Featured By Owner Jan 4, 2015
I guess Doraemon wasn't too far off: [link]
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:iconlordofstamps:
LordOfstamps Featured By Owner Sep 28, 2014
Christian Foth pointed out that the pennacious feathers might actually be monofilimentious (hope I spelled that right) because those would probably preserve similar traces.
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner Sep 28, 2014
That's absolutely right (and others pointed it out online prior to the publication of Foth et al.'s paper). You might notice that I didn't use the term "pennaceous" in my description of the find.
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:iconlordofstamps:
LordOfstamps Featured By Owner Sep 28, 2014
Oh I see.
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:iconjd-man:
JD-man Featured By Owner Oct 29, 2012
I was originally expecting Pelecanimimus, but this is even better, both b/c of the conditions it was preserved in & b/c of the evidence for wing feathers. What I'm wondering is if ornithomimosaurs brooded their nests like true maniraptors?
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner Oct 29, 2012
That's certainly a possibility!
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:iconjd-man:
JD-man Featured By Owner Oct 29, 2012
Someone should draw a brooding ornithomimosaur (preferably someone w/talent). I nominate you.
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner Oct 29, 2012
Aw, I'm honored. I'll see if I can get around to that, but don't be surprised if someone beats me to it. :D
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:iconspongebobfossilpants:
At this rate, the 80s meme of feathered Coelophysis rhodesiensis will prove correct!
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner Oct 27, 2012
:D
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:iconrichardelder:
RichardElder Featured By Owner Oct 26, 2012  Hobbyist
This was found in Alberta and has been at the Royal Tyrrell Museum for a long time. I've known about this since August 2010!
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner Oct 26, 2012
Yes, one of the examined specimens has been on display for years, and the two newer ones were discovered in 2008-2009. However, the paper describing all this hadn't been published until yesterday, so until then most of us were not in the know. ;)
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:iconrichardelder:
RichardElder Featured By Owner Oct 26, 2012  Hobbyist
I know I would have wanted to say something but that would be like spoilers :P
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner Oct 26, 2012
Yep, better not to break embargo (and more satisfying to spring a surprise on everyone else!).
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:iconornitholestes1:
Ornitholestes1 Featured By Owner Oct 26, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Aw man, I just drew Ornithomimus... now it's innacurate!
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner Oct 26, 2012
Always a prominent risk in paleontology! XD
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:iconiherduleikdragonites:
This... is the best thing to happen this month other than perhaps the SVP meeting. I plan to draw this new Ornithomimus soon.
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:iconfiftyfootwhatever:
FiftyFootWhatever Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2012
Something I made just for this occasion: [link]
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2012
:D
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:icontyrannotitan333:
Tyrannotitan333 Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Wow, never saw this coming!

Also can't wait to see other maniraptors get the proto-wing treatment...
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:iconzimices:
Zimices Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2012  Hobbyist
Finally! Now Ornithomimus really will honor their name :thumbsup:
You know which species of Ornithomimus is it?
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2012
It's O. edmontonicus.
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:icondemonraptorwulf:
demonraptorwulf Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2012
Best discovery of the year. Now they will look even more like ostriches....
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:iconclassicalguy:
classicalguy Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2012  Student General Artist
This is beautiful!
I always enjoy it when a well-known extinct animal gets a complete makeover, first Triceratops, then Tyrannosaurus, and now our good buddy Ornithomimus!
And now I can say for sure that they remind me of ostriches: [link]
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2012
Indeed! Though we don't really know how long the wing feathers were.
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:iconzombiesaurian:
ZombieSaurian Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2012  Student Digital Artist
YEEEEESSSS!
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:iconjulio-lacerda:
Julio-Lacerda Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
Oh god, I always thought ornithomimosaurs were too primitive to have vaned feathers, and internally criticized people that gave them wings. Back to the drawing board!
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2012
No worries; that would've been the best guess prior to this. Science marches on!
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:iconjulio-lacerda:
Julio-Lacerda Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
Oh, how it does! That's good to show us that it doesn't matter the time; scientific breakthroughs are always going to happen, and paleoart will aways get outdated :D
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2012
True story.
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:iconjulio-lacerda:
Julio-Lacerda Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
Also, does that mean that alvarezsaurids and therizinosaurids likely had 'wings' too?
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2012
My guess would be yes. After all, Beipiaosaurus already preserves long arm feathers, which may just be part of a poorly-preserved wing...
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:iconjulio-lacerda:
Julio-Lacerda Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
That raises a lot of possibilities.. Perhaps the Beipiaosaurus specimen had not reached sexual maturity yet (I do not know details about it's presumed age at the time of death), perhaps therizinosaurs (or Beipiaosaurus specifically) had lost wings for whatever reason (since therizinosaurs don't seem like very good candidates for nest-brooders and since wing feathers apparently evolved for display mostly, they may have abandoned more intricate sexual displays or relied on other structures for that) or the feathers may simply have not been preserved properly. I'm also interested on how this applies to alvarezsaurids, since the most derived forms barely had enough arms for wing supporting and must have used their claws in non-feather-friendly ways..
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2012
Interestingly, Jason Brougham has speculated that alvarezsaurids had very big arm feathers, and it's even been suggested that reduced forelimb parts correlate with bigger wing feathers. Only time will tell though, I guess.
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:iconrickraptor105:
RickRaptor105 Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2012
I think pretty much every fluffy Ornithomimosaur reconstruction on the internet has just been made outdated.
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2012
Essentially so!
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:iconrickraptor105:
RickRaptor105 Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2012
Just when you thought new discoveries canīt amaze you further...

"Colour pigments canīt be preserved in fossils" - disproved
"Feathers or fur canīt be preserved in fossils" - disproved decades ago
"Feathers and fur canīt be preserved in anything other than very fine sediments" - now disproved, too!

I hope it wonīt be long till the first direct evidence of feathers in Deinonychus, Dromaeosaurus and Tyrannosaurus rex.
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2012
Agreed. Of course, we did have Shuvuuia feathers back in 1999.

Careful though, there was a poster at SVP that may turn the color pigments thing back on its head...
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:iconspongebobfossilpants:
"Careful though, there was a poster at SVP that may turn the color pigments thing back on its head..."

What do you mean?
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner Oct 26, 2012
It was suggested that the melanosomes are actually bacterial film, or something along those lines (and no, not from BANDits).
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October 25, 2012
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